Posts Tagged With: wine

Hot off the press! Our New Vegan Wine and Tapas Tasting Menu

 

Join us for award-winning wines, creative plant-based tapas dishes….

 

Hot off the press, a sample menu for all you lucky people heading over to our vegan wine extravaganza in Manchester in a few weeks!

BOOK NOW

 

Click here for bookings and details

 

 

VEGAN WINE AND TAPAS EVENING – MANCHESTER
9th November ‘19

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SAMPLE MENU
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ARRIVAL CHAMPAGNE
Nicholas Feuillate, Vintage 2009
A special treat with notes of brioche, baking apples and hazelnuts

Roasted Herb and Maple Nuts, Vegetable Crisps, Piri Piri Chickpeas

 

WHITES
Vinalba Torrontes
A refreshing wine with delicate flavours of lychees, white peaches and pears

Thai Ghost Pumpkin and Coconut Soup

Martin Codax Albarino
A fantastic expression of the coastal community of Rias Biaxas, tasting of white peaches, lime zest and salty sea-spray

Smoked Carrots, Dill, Labneh

Albana Secco Campodora
An exceedingly rare grape, not found outside of Romagna. It has delicate flavours of apricots, quinces and white flowers

Kichi Muri and Sage Farroto

Escarpment Chardonnay
A far cry from the clumsy, mug-you-in-an-alleyway Aussie Chardonnays that many people remember, this critically acclaimed wine has long and slow flavours of peaches, apricots, melons and toasted nuts

Roasted Cauliflower and Butter Bean Hummus, Confit Garlic

 

REDS
Louis Latour Bourgogne Pinot Noir
This offering from Burgundy tastes of cherries, bramble, strawberries and liquorice

Wild Mushroom Sausage, Red Cabbage and Apple Sauerkraut

Domaine Tourelles Pierre Brun
A Lebanese wine, it brings flavours of dried dark fruit against complex herbal notes of liquorice, black pepper and cardamom

Roasted Lebanese Vegetables, Pomegranate, Tahini Sauce

Springfield Thunderchild
Grown on the estate of the Herberg Children’s Home in South Africa, all the profits from this wine go straight back to that same orphanage. A complex wine full of dried mint and smoky forest fruit flavours

Glazed Umami Burgers, Pickled Ginger, Wasabi Mayo, Baechu Kimchi

Masi Costasera Amarone
A premium Italian wine that is full of indulgent flavours of baked plums and cherries, spices, coffee and dark chocolate

Porcini Ragu, Caramelised Artichoke, Smoky Parmesan Crumb, Black Kale Leaf

 

CHEESE BOARD
Roast Garlic Cream Cheese, Nettle Moxarella, Radish Bombs, Fermented Mushroom Pate – platters

 

DESSERT
Royal Tokaji
A Hungarian dessert wine, this is what emperors used to give as presents to one another. Have this in very small glasses because the delightful sweet flavours of orange zest, caramel, raisins, honey and exotic spices are a real treat to be savoured

Cacao and Hazelnut Brownies, Single Estate Chocolate, Lavender Oranges

 

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Vegetables supplied by Tyddyn Teg Organic Farm, Bethel, North Wales
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Categories: Events, plant-based, Vegan, vegan cheese | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vegan Wine and Tapas Evening ~ Manchester, Saturday 9th November 2019

Vegan Wine Tasting and Tapas Evening, Manchester

For one night in November, the vegan chef, Lee Watson (author of ‘Peace & Parsnips’ cookbook), and professional wine geek, Robert Moore, are teaming up to bring you an entertaining and exclusive evening of delicious wine and food pairing.

 

Guests will be treated to ten fabulous wines* from around the world, each wine being specially paired with mouth-watering tapas from the same country.

 

Lee will be creating bespoke recipes especially for the evening, using local, seasonal produce, most of which will be organic. It promises to be a menu filled with plant-based surprises and bold, creative flavours that everyone will enjoy, vegan or otherwise.

Albariño grapes in Rías Baixas, Lee has just returned from Galicia in Spain. We will be sampling a crisp, citrus and floral Albariño soon….

As you try each of the wines and accompanying tapas, you’ll be learning not only how to properly taste wines, but more about the wine making process and regions where they grow.

 

Did we mention that all the wines and all the food are completely vegan? We did? Oh, good.

 

Rob has created a varied and dynamic vegan wine list, one which will take your tastebuds on a global adventure. He will be answering any questions you have about the wine, as well as imparting knowledge on how to best match wine and food, offering you skills to asses and buy quality vegan wines.

 

Lee will talk about the dishes and how they were prepared, sharing vegan cooking tips, plus you will leave with a recipe booklet containing a number of the tapas recipes so you can try them at home for yourself.

 

We are in the process of finalising the wine list and menu and will be let you know further details very soon.

 

Come and join us for a celebration of the best vegan wines and delicious plant-based flavours!

 

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What’s included:

 

– Ten stunning wines from around the world; vintage champagne, red, white and a very special dessert wine, hand picked by Rob

 

– A variety of creative tapas, vegan cheese and canapes to compliment the wine

 

Knowledge and skills to taste wines with confidence, enhancing your wine drinking experience

 

– A guide to pairing wine and food collated by Rob

 

– An original recipe booklet by Lee

 

A fine selection of global Reds awaits!

 

Tickets for the evening:

 

£79 per person

 

CLICK HERE TO BOOK 

 

 

Address:

St. Clement’s Church, Edge Lane, Chorlton

M21 9AE

 

7.30pm – 10pm

 

 Contact us at wineandwaistcoats@gmail.com

 

Gluten-free options available

*All wines are kindly supplied by Majestic Wines

**Early Bird Offer ends 26/9/19

 

Categories: Events, gluten-free, plant-based, Vegan, veganism | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Black Olive Tapenade with Beetroot and Red Onion Salad

Beetroot and Red Onion Salad with Black Olive Tapenade

Tapenade is one of those things that we don’t eat enough of.  Everytime we have it, we say the same thing, “Why are we not eating more tapenade!”  It is delicious and is one of those classic summer dishes that reminds me of holidays in Greece and France.

I ate alot of tapenade at break times whilst picking grapes in Beaujolais.  We’d have it spread over warm baguettes, with local cheese and lashings of whatever wine was in the bucket (purely medicinal, it helped to dull the back pain you see).  I believe that the intense satisfaction I got from munching the tapenade pulled me through those back breaking times.  The wine was certainly nothing to get excited about, unfortunately.

This is a wonderful concoction of flavours that I’ve had a little play with (of course) and omitted the use of capers due to a forgetful moment at the shops.  The unique caper-ness has been replaced by the gorgeous sun-dried tomato.  Not a bad substitute!  I have also added raisins to add a little sweetness, the black olives can be a little bitter in these parts, Wales not being high on the olive producing charts.   The rest is fairly classic tapenade, forming a delectable black paste that can be spread or dipped as you choose.  I love this type of food, which is greater than the sum of its bits.

I normally think of Tapenade as being a Greek dish, but it actually hales from Provencal in France.  Traditionally this puree contains caper, anchovies, black olives and olive oil.  The French would normally serve it as an hors d’oeurve or stuff it into a steak.

Tapenade is alot like pesto (see our ‘Hazelnut Pesto‘ post) in that it is a joy to behold sitting in the fridge door.  It just hangs around and marinates, getting better and better.  It goes well in so many things and mixed with some oil, makes for an instant wonder dressing.  The best part is that it has a gourmet flavour with very little needed in way of preparation.

The way you chop up your veg has a major effect on the presentation and texture of a salad.  Have a little think before you begin to chop about what type of effect you’d like to create.

If you spend a little more on good quality olives here, it is well worth it.  The black variety are normally a little cheaper and in their own way, just as good as some of their greener brothers and sisters.

The Bits

Tapenade – 1 cup black olive, 6 sun dried tomatoes, 2 cloves crunched garlic, 1/2 red onion, 1/4 cup raisins, juice of 1 lemon, handful of chopped parsley, sprig of rosemary, pinch of thyme and oregano, glug of olive oil, cracked black pepper and sea salt (to taste), glug of olive oil (if needed)

Salad – 1 nice red onion (thinly sliced), 4 small beetroots (cut into eighth’s), 2 cups of spinach (chopped), 3 carrots (grated), 2 stalks celery (chopped), 1 cupful of sprouts (we used green lentil sprouts)

Black Olive Tapenade in the mix…..

Do It

Tapenade – Add all ingredients to a food processor and begin to whizz.  As it becomes sticky, trickle in some remaining olive oil to create a beautiful, shiny puree.  Keep in a sealed container in the fridge overnight for maximum marination (new word for you there!).

Salad – We put the red onion and carrot into a food processor and grated, then chopped the celery, spinach and beetroot separately.

Serve

Thin out some tapenade by adding the same quantity of good olive oil and whisking well.  You can lower the amount of tapenade if you’d prefer a lighter dressing.  Pour the dressing over the salad and give a good mix in.

Place in your favourite salad bowl and top with a handful of green lentil sprouts (see our ‘sprout‘ post for how to sprout your own, its quite simple).  Then spoon on some tapenade.

We have also used it to flavour soups and stews and of course in post June days we’d have it lathered on some warm oat bread.

We Love It!

This tapenade has a great balance of bitter and sweet, with the beautiful silky texture of pureed olives.

Foodie Fact

Olives are one of the oldest foods known, dating back 7,000 years.  Black Olives are left to ripen for longer on the trees, green ones are picked earlier, they generally have a milder flavour.  Olives are a good source of iron (which helps to carry oxegen in our blood) and are low in calories with plenty of good fats.  They do however contain a decent amount of sodium and should be eaten in moderation if you’re keeping an eye on salt intake.

Twelve black olives provide 1.8mg of iron.  Interestingly women need 18mg of iron per day and men only 8mg.

Categories: Dinner, Dressings, gluten-free, Healthy Eating, Low G.I. (glycemic index), Lunch, Raw Food, Recipes, Salads, Side Dish, Snacks and Inbetweens, Vegan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Homemade Ricotta with Wild Garlic and Mint

Wild garlic and mint

I realise that I write regularly about making my own cheese.  It is something that I am quite fascinated by.  I have tried yoghurt and using live cultures etc, but it is difficult, especially due to the fluctuating temperature of our cottage (we only have a wood burning stove for heat) and the temperamental weather (British weather is utterly mental).  Live cultures etc don’t seem to like this, they are sensitive sorts.

Making ricotta requires non of this effort.  It is a fail safe method of making your own gorgeous cheese.  Not complex or pungent, but super smooth and creamy.  Every time.

This is a simple technique.  I would advise you seek out good quality, organic milk for best results.  Once you try it, you will not want to go back to the shop bought variety.  This is a real homemade treat that takes no time at all and actually saves you money.

I have mixed a few fresh herbs in here.  We had just picked some wild garlic, we took a wrong turn on Anglesey and ended up driving through a field of the stuff! The mint is beautiful looking, grown by the good people at Hooton’s Homegrown.  I walked into the kitchen this morning and was greeted by the wonderful aroma of these two and could not resist combining them with the cheese.

Ricotta means ‘recooked’ in Italian and is a so versatile.  It goes well in savoury and sweet dishes.  I love it with some warm oat bread and honey and it makes a delicious base for pasta sauces, we have also used it with dark chocolate for dessert (see here).   This ricotta recipe is excellent as it can be stirred directly into warm pasta.  It is basically a great thing to have in the fridge.

I am sure that this is one of those cooking techniques that you will use again and again. You can even make paneer, just use the same method but use a semi skimmed milk (the ricotta uses whole milk).  See a recipe here on the brilliant Kolpona cuisine blog.

There is no waste here.  After the curds have formed, drink the whey.  This is packed full of good protein.  It’s the same stuff those muscle bound freaks buy for inflated prices (and biceps!).  The whey can also be used in cooking, its great in stews, soups and even breads.

Cheesecloth had always eluded me.  I had heard of this mythical fabric but never owned any.  I have resorted to all sorts of strange methods to compensate for it.  I mentioned this to Jane and in her ever thoughtful fashion, she bought some in a little shop somewhere in Yorkshire.  I am now the proud owner of a metre square.  Thank you honey!

The Bits

1 litre of good whole fat milk (makes enough for a decent sized ball), juice of 1 lemon or 2 tbs cider vinegar (or any distilled vinegar), 1 teas sea salt, 1 handful of wild garlic, 1 handful of fresh mint, 1 piece of muslin/ cheese cloth.

Homemade ricotta with wild garlic and mint

Do It

Heat the milk in a pan gently until it is steaming and small bubbles are forming around the edges, do not boil.  Add the lemon juice of vinegar, then stir a couple of times to mix.  Take off the heat and leave for 5 minutes, allowing the curds to form.  Line a medium sieve with your cheese cloth and place over a bowl.  Gently pour the milk/ cheese through the sieve and allow to drain.

Making the cheese

The longer you leave it to drain, the drier the cheese.  Think about what you would like to us it for.   I recommend leaving it for around 10 minutes.  Cool and cover, place in the fridge, it be good for around a week.

When the cheese is fully dried, chop your herbs finely and mix in with the cheese.  If it is proving to be too dry, mix in a little olive oil to get things lubricated.  Taste the cheese, add more salt if you like.

Using vinegar will give a cleaner flavour, lemon will make it slightly lemony.  Again, it depends on how you would like to use the cheese.

Serve

We had ours mixed into roasted root veggies, with our Sprouting Spring Salad.

Roasted root vegetable

Foodie Fact

You can use goats milk for the ricotta, it will be more tangy.  In Italy they use alot of sheeps milk, which is very smooth and creamy and of course the famous buffalo milk, which is equally as good.  It is fun to experiment with different milks.  I have to say, I like the ricotta we get from local Welsh milk.

Calon Wen Milk

Pickled Part

You can’t beat a crisp dry white wine with a fresh cheese like ricotta, something to cut through that awesome creaminess and get your palate sparkling.  We had a lovely Chilean Sauvignon Blanc which worked a treat.

Categories: Local food, Organic, Recipes, Snacks and Inbetweens, Wales, Welsh produce, Wild food | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

The Beach House Kitchen nominated for the Versatile Blogger Award

The nominations are coming in thick and fast this month!  Hooray.

We are really happy to see people reading and enjoying the blog and to get a nomination for anything, makes it even more special.

Thanks to More Than Greens for the vote, it’s a relatively new blog, but already there are some very tasty recipes to be found and lovely pictures of all things vegetal.  We love their moto:

There’s so much more to vegetarianism that rabbit food…

The Versatile Blogger Award is a great way of meeting other like-minded bloggers and getting folk to have a look at your pages (I believe it is known as ‘traffic’).

The rules for the Versatile Blogger are as follows:

If you are nominated, you’ve been awarded the Versatile Blogger award.

  •  Thank the person who gave you this award
  •  Include a link to their blog
  •  Select 15 blogs/bloggers that you’ve recently discovered or follow regularly
  •  Nominate those 15 bloggers for the Versatile Blogger Award
  •  Finally, tell the person who nominated you 7 things about yourself

Fifteen blogs I’ve recently discovered:

I love all of these blogs, but unfortunately don’t have time today to write individually about each one.   There is an incredible amount of talent and delicious looking food here.  You’ll find these blogs nestled in our ‘links’ column on the right hand side of the screen.

I’ve chosen only food blogs and those that I hope have not been nominated before (in no particular order):

–  Allotment 2 Kitchen

–  Bananas and Beans

–  Fig and Fork

–  Fork and Beans

–  Heathy Belly Ellie

–  Mother Nature Loves You

–  The Hearty Herbivore

–  Vegetarian Ventures

–  Emmy Cooks

–  Kolpona Cuisine

–  The Post Punk Kitchen

–  The Lab Kitchen

–  The Vogue Vegetarian

–  Turning Veganese

–  The Raw Warung

–  Celery and Cupcakes

 The Farmers Market Foodie

Seven things (not all interesting) you may not know about me:

–  I haven’t always had a beard

–  I play the guitarlele with gusto

–  I always prefer hazelnuts (or cashews)

–  I’m eating only raw food this June

–  I love all things bean and bean related

–  I have just completed our veg patch (watch this space for blooming info)

–  I one day dream of making my own wine (proper wine with grapes that is)

The Beach House Kitchen

Thanks again to More Than Greens for the kind nomination.

Happy blogging and munching,

Lee and JaneX

@ the B.H.K.

Categories: Awards/ Recognition, Blogs, Friends of B.H.K | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Coconut & Sweet Potato Polenta with Asian Vegetables

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Mwynhewch eich bwyd! (Bon appetit in Welsh)

The East meets Wales with a stopover in Rome.

This is a rich polenta dish that adds a full-on Eastern flavour to this very European dish.
We served this dish with pan-fried Asian vegetables, flavoured with sweet chilli. We kept the veg organic and as local as possible, so we made some substitutions here. Instead of water chestnut, we used chunks of jerusalem artichoke, instead of pak choi, we used swiss chard, instead of spring onion, we used leek.  You can use any mixture of veg here, preferably a good mix of colours and textures.

This is luxurious modern dish that takes little time to prepare and was inspired by chef Paul Gayler, who’s recipes I find extaordinary.

This makes enough for two hungry people with leftovers.

The Bits

Polenta

1 large sweet potato (peeled and chopped)

1 1/2 pint of veg. stock

1 1/2 cups of coconut milk

4 cups of polenta

salt and pepper

 

Veg

3 cloves of sliced garlic

1 leek sliced

2cm cube of ginger sliced

1 teas chilli flakes or fresh sliced chilli

1 small head of broccoli chopped

4 jerusalem artichoke chopped into chunks

1 large carrot

1 large handful of chopped swiss chard

splash of veg stock

4 tbls sweet chilli sauce (we use Linghams brand)

splash of veg oil

 

Do It

Polenta – Simmer veg stock in pan, cook sweet potato in stock until tender, around 15 minutes.  Blend with stock to a smooth paste in a blender.  Put mix back into a pan, add coconut milk, bring to a gentle simmer and add polenta gradually whilst stirring.  Texture should be that of a wet mash.  Season.  Cover and leave on a low heat until serving.

Veg. – Move onto veg, all pre-chopped and ready to go (important when cooking in an asian style, which is quickly cooked and immediately served, fresh and crunchy).  Heat the oil in a frying pan or wok, add garlic, ginger and chilli, fry for 30 seconds, add all veg and toss together for a couple of minutes, then add the splash of stock and chilli sauce.

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The new Beach House herb garden

Serve

In big warmed bowls, polenta poured into the base topped by the veg., spoon on the sauce  Serve and eat asap.

We Love It!

This is a really new take on Polenta for me.  The coconut adds a real luxurious finish to the polenta, which the sweet sauce compliments perfectly.  YUM.

Foodie Fact

Ginger, a pungent root with incredible properties.  Famed throughout the ages for its soothing effect on the intestines.  It can ease intestinal gas and relax the digestive tract.  Ginger is very effective at eliminating the effects of motion sickness and can generally help against nausea.  It contains gingerols that are a powerful anti-inflammatory compounds, aiding ailments like arthritis.  Gingerols also help us to fight off the big ‘C’.  Ginger boosts the immune system, which is why it seems so good on a cold morning with a little hot lemon and honey.  What a root!

Boozy Bit

Light white, medium bodied wine.  I would recommend a nice German White like a Riesling or Gewürztraminer.  Good German whites are not cheap, but well worth it, especially with spiced Eastern dishes.

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Jane outside the Beach House, the day after the spring blizzard.

Categories: Local food, Recipes, Special Occasion, Vegan, Wales, Welsh produce, Wine and Booze | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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