Posts Tagged With: yoga

Hot off the press! Announcing our next two vegan cooking retreats

 

We’re very excited to announce our next two vegan cooking retreats at the wonderful Trigonos.

One World Vegan – 4 day healthy cooking retreat
29 August – 2 September 2017

Home Cooked Happiness – 4 day simple vegan cooking retreat
16 – 20 September 2017

Full details are below.

Both courses will be packed with creative plant-based cooking, with optional yoga and meditation as well as evening entertainment and a long walk in the beautiful Snowdonia valleys.

All bookings and enquiries are via Trigonos here or contact on info@trigonos.org for a booking form and more info.

We have limited places available, we like to keep the groups small, it’s more intimate that way.  Gluten-free options available for all recipes.

See you in beautiful North Wales soon.

Lee & Jane:)

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ONE WORLD VEGAN: 4 DAY HEALTHY COOKING RETREAT

29 August – 2 September 2017
Led by Lee Watson
Author of Peace and Parsnips – Vegan Cooking for Everyone (Penguin/Michael Joseph)
co-presenter ‘Meat vs Veg’ TV Programme (24Kitchen)

A Trigonos Course

Join us for a rejuvenating, informative and fun retreat in idyllic Snowdonia and learn to cook traditional and contemporary vegan dishes from around the globe. Inspired by Lee’s travel experiences and the recipes, knowledge and tales he’s picked up along the way, this four day retreat will give an introduction Mexican, Indian, African, South East Asian and more with plenty of surprise additions and creative twists that all home cooks can master and everyone enjoy.

The emphasis will be on seasonal and local UK produce, along with essential and readily available ingredients from around the world. Recipes will be healthy and fresh, simple and quick. From exotic desserts to the world’s simplest curry, street food delights and Buddha bowls, we’ll explore all the delicious potential plant-based food has to offer.

The retreat will be informative and relaxing at the same time. Coffee, tea, herbal infusions and treats are free flowing – very important!

We have optional beginners yoga and meditation to start the day in a peaceful way, followed by breakfast with fresh juices and smoothies. Then cooking demonstrations with Lee with opportunities to get hands-on and involved.

Time is set aside to explore the beautiful nature and landscapes around Trigonos with an afternoon set aside for walking in the mountains and valleys of Snowdonia. Each evening will bring local entertainment and drinks by the fire in the Trigonos library, with optional meditation to end the day.

This retreat will be ideal for anyone looking to try something new in the kitchen, spice up their cooking and get adventurous!

Prices from £380 to £550

We’ll be using lots of fresh produce grown on the Trigonos land (check out those tomatoes!!)

 

HOME COOKED HAPPINESS: 4 DAY SIMPLE VEGAN COOKING

16 – 20 September 2017
Led by Lee Watson
Author of Peace and Parsnips – Vegan Cooking for Everyone (Penguin/Michael Joseph)
Co-presenter ‘Meat vs Veg’ TV Programme (24Kitchen)

Looking for a healthy kick-start in the kitchen, something quick and easy that all the family will enjoy? Seeking simple and inspiring dishes that you’ll want to cook all the time? In this retreat we’ll learn the basic skills for transforming fruits, nuts and vegetables into nutritious and delicious meals that everyone will love. All dishes have been highly rated by non-vegans! This is quick, creative and delicious cooking on a budget.

We know that eating more fruit and vegetables is important for good health. A balanced vegan diet can be very healthy and it doesn’t cost the earth.

The cooking demonstrations by Lee will give even the beginner the confidence to explore the creative and nutritious potential in plant-based foods whilst having fun in the kitchen. We’ll be ‘veganising’ many classic dishes and learning simple techniques covering breakfast, bread, soups, starters, salads, stews, bakes, cakes and many desserts.

The retreat is also designed as a relaxing break from our busy lives, somewhere you can recharge. We’ll have optional meditation and yoga in mornings and evenings. Fresh juices and herbal infusions are always available, along with plenty of treats, fresh coffee and nice surprises along the way.

You’ll have ample time to explore the beautiful area around Trigonos and there will be an optional hike in the mountains and valleys of Snowdonia. Every night we’ll relax around the fire in the comfort of the Trigonos library and enjoy drinks and local entertainment.

This is vegan cooking for everyone and we’ll make even the simplest of produce shine.

Prices from £320 to £490

To book your place contact Trigonos on 01286 882 388

 

 

Categories: Cooking Retreats, Healthy Eating, Vegan, veganism, Wales | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

‘Discovering Vegan Cooking’ Workshop and Retreat 1st – 4th March ’16

Lee-Watson (2)

THE PLEASURES AND BENEFITS OF A VEGAN DIET ARE OPEN TO ALL.  THIS WORKSHOP WILL SHOW YOU HOW………

Join Jane and I for a rejuvenating and instructive healthy vegan cooking adventure in a wonderful lakeside retreat centre in Snowdonia.

As well as hands-on cooking workshops there will be optional yoga and meditation sessions as well as a music workshop and much more…….

The ideal Spring pick me up!

Jane getting to grips with an onion - Udaipur, 2/14

Trigonos is set in stunning lakeside grounds in the heart of Snowdonia

We’d  love to hear from you with any questions or contact the Trigonos team for more information and bookings.

Residential and non-residential places are available.

Trigonos

Plas Baladeulyn, Nantlle, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales, UK. LL54 6BW

Phone – 01286  882 388

Email – info@trigonos.org

We’re so excited about this course and can’t wait to welcome you to North Wales!

L+Jx

Walking near Trigonos, stunning views of Snowdon

Walking near Trigonos, stunning views of Snowdon

Categories: Healthy Eating, Vegan, Wales | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

‘2016…Time for Peace of Mind’ – My latest article for the Barefoot Vegan Magazine

I am loving writing for the Barefoot Vegan Magazine.  Read my most recent article ‘2016…Time for Peace of Mind’ below.  My feelings about how we can find peace, balance, prosperity and satisfaction in 2016.

You can subscribe to the Barefoot Vegan for free (which is an unbelievably great offer).  The magazine is now bi-monthly and is the perfect source of inspiration for body, mind and soul.  If you’re looking towards a brighter 2016, the Barefoot Vegan is a shining light!

Barefoot Vegan Mag Jan_Feb 2016 Lee 1 (1)

 

Barefoot Vegan Mag Jan_Feb 2016 Lee 21541289

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

This is our first post of the new year and we’ve had a beautiful festive period; filled with family and warmth.

We both wanted to express out massive thanks to you all for all the incredible support in 2015. You bring The Beach House Kitchen to life!  2016 is looking equally as exciting and tasty, we have loads of news to share with you and of course, many, many BHK style recipes to post.

Have a delicious 2016 and most of all, happy cooking!

Peace & Love,

Lee and JaneX

Categories: barefoot vegan, Healthy Living, Inspiration, Vegan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Come join us for a cooking retreat in beautiful Snowdonia!

 

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I’ll be demonstrating the joys of vegan cooking. Delicious, creative and healthy (with loads of treats along the way).

COME JOIN US!

Jane and I are excited to announce our first full retreat this December at Trigonos, located in beautiful Snowdonia, the retreat centre where I cook.  We’d love to welcome you there for a revitalising weekend with great food and much, much more!  Find details of the retreat below:

Discovering Vegan Cooking – Workshop and Retreat

with Lee Watson, Trigonos Chef

11th – 14th December 2015

The pleasures and benefits of a vegan diet are open to all. This workshop and retreat shows you how.

Join Lee Watson, Trigonos Chef (author of the vegan cookbook ‘Peace and Parsnips’ and presenter of ‘Meat vs Veg’ TV Programme) for a rejuvenating and instructive healthy vegan cooking adventure. The ideal mid-winter, pre-Christmas pick me up!

For further details and a booking form see here.

To reserve your place phone Trigonos 01286 882388 or email info@trigonos.org

Jane getting to grips with an onion - Udaipur, 2/14

Jane will assisting all weekend and showing us the wonders of juicing and smoothie making.

We'll be cooking some recipes from Peace & Parsnips (our new vegan cookbook)

We’ll be cooking some recipes from Peace & Parsnips (our new vegan cookbook)

You'll be sampling a whole host of vegan treats, from divine Indian curries.....

You’ll be sampling a whole host of vegan treats, from divine Indian curries…..

....to tasty burgers.....

….tasty burgers…..

....to desserts for all!

….to desserts for all and everything in between!

Trigonos is set in stunning lakeside grounds in the heart of Snowdonia

Trigonos is set in stunning lakeside grounds in the heart of Snowdonia

We will be using many vegetables from our farm, all grown using organic principles

We will be using many vegetables from our farm, all grown using organic principles

There will be plenty f time to relax and take in the stunning scenery.....

You are free, with plenty of time to relax, read in the library or take in the stunning scenery

The Nantlle Valley awaits!

There will also be daily gentle yoga and meditation and much more…….. The Nantlle Valley awaits! 

 

 

Categories: Detox, Healthy Eating, Nutrition, Organic, photography, Vegan, Vegetarian, Wales | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Aviyal – Keralan Coconut and Vegetable Curry with Watermelon and Pineapple Salad

Aviyal - Keralan Coconut and Vegetable Curry with Pineapple and Watermelon Salad

Aviyal – Keralan Coconut and Vegetable Curry with Pineapple and Watermelon Salad

A simple, light summer curry with all the joys and sparkling nutrition of coconut and seasonal vegetables.  This is a recipe straight outta Peace & Parsnips and was recently featured online here in Reveal Magazine.  Recipes like this are a wonderful reminder for me of special times spent travelling and cooking in India.  Kerala is surely one of the most beautiful corners of the planet and its food is surprisingly vegan friendly, diverse and really healthy.

This is a recipe I learnt from my friend Narendra on the patio of a wooden hut in a yoga retreat, rural Tamil Nadu.  Although this is (probably) a traditional Keralan style curry, they love it in neighbouring Tamil Nadu also.  I had been eating it regularly in India and was so pleased when Narendra took the time to sit down with me and finally get a recipe on paper.  He taught me his families traditional recipe, from the ancient temple town of Madurai, and it was pleasing simple.  Like many Indian family staples, the difference is in the freshness of the ingredients; the vegetables and the spices.  Most Indian households will have what I call a ‘Sabji’ (Vegetable) man.  Just like a milk man in the UK, he wanders the streets in the mornings selling his wares from a cart, shouting up to the windows of house wives what’s good , freshest and of course, on special offer!  Fresh vegetables are everywhere in India and veg markets are frequent and always interesting to wander around and pick up some funky looking spice or odd looking root (maybe a mooli or two?).

The beaches of North Kerala are stunning!

The beaches of North Kerala are stunning! Kannur

Although this is a simple recipe, cooked most days in Keralan homes, it adapts well to the changing seasons in most countries.  Any variety of vegetables can be used in its preparation and Aviyal lends itself perfectly to British/ European veg.  In fact, Narendra’s grandmother used to call things like carrots ‘British veg’ as they we only grown and popularised in the time of the Raj, when much of Indian cooking as we know it was altered and influenced by British tastes.

The ladies at Varnam Homestay, Wayanand, Kerala - Lunch prep in full swing

The women Varnam Homestay, Wayanand, Kerala – Lunch prep in full swing

I was lucky to cook in a beautiful kitchen near Wayanad National Park, Northern Kerala with some amazing ladies.  Here I learnt some proper Keralan classics and top tips that you can only learn by actually getting your hands on the pots and pans.  I loved the way that they used very roasted coconut to add depth and flavour to sauces, especially when used with piles of freshly grated ginger.  I also loved cooking with a wide range of local produce, all of their dishes contained only ingredients from their own land.  Spices and all!  They even grew their own coffee and we were inundated each day with fresh exotic fruits, many of which I’d never seen before.  Mangoes grew above the hammocks in the garden, guavas, green figs, coconuts, plantains……you can imagine, it was a bit like eden/ nirvana!

Cooking at Varnam Homestay, Kerala

Cooking at Varnam Homestay, Kerala

Aviyal is such a healthy, light dish, nothing like the rich and fiery curries of the much of North India.  Coconut is king in the south, making travelling around South India a foodie paradise for vegans.  Its up there with places like Thailand or parts of the Med for traditional vegan dishes.  Anywhere that the vegetable or coconut thrives, you find brilliant vegan dishes.  Vegan food is so creative and evolving all the time, but it is nice to find dishes on my travels that reflect a cultures heritage and history.  We’ve always eaten and enjoyed vegan dishes, we just don’t necessarily give them that name (which, for whatever reason, can put some people off).

Indian spices, down at the market

Indian spices, down at the market

The Bits – For 4
For the curry
•2-3 fresh green chillies
•2 big handfuls of freshly grated or desiccated coconut
•2tsp cumin seeds
•220ml coconut milk or unsweetened soya yogurt
•2 large carrots, scrubbed
•2 large potatoes, scrubbed
•1 large courgette
•6 fat asparagus spears
•2 green plantains, peeled
•200ml water
•1tsp ground turmeric
•1tsp of sea salt
•1 big handful of mangetout or green beans
•2tbsp coconut oil
•2tsp mustard seeds
•3tbsp curry leaves
For the pineapple & watermelon salad
•A small pineapple
•One third of a small watermelon (don’t bother deseeding)
•1 large cucumber
•1 small handful of fresh coriander, roughly chopped
•A pinch of sea salt
•A large pinch of chaat masala mix or black salt (optional)

Do It
In a pestle and mortar or a food processor, blend together the chillies, coconut and cumin seeds (if you’re using desiccated coconut, add 2tbsp of the coconut milk to make a thick paste). This is best done in advance and can be left overnight in the fridge to develop zing.

Cut the carrots, potatoes, courgette, asparagus and plantains into 2.5cm pieces. Heat the water in a large pan and add the turmeric, salt, carrots and potatoes. Bring to a steady boil, then lower the heat to a simmer and pop a lid on the pan. Cook for 10 minutes, then add the courgettes and plantains and cook for 10 minutes more, keeping the lid on.

Add the coconut paste to the curry with the coconut milk or yogurt and stir carefully to combine. Cook uncovered for 8-10 mins on a gentle simmer. Check that the carrots and potatoes are tender, then add the asparagus and mangetout and remove the pan from the heat. Cover, set aside for a few minutes.

Jane and I in the Yoga Retreat, Tamil Nadu

Jane and I in the Yoga Retreat, Tamil Nadu

Serve

Really simply, with steamed rice.  Keralans love their rice!  A crunchy salad is great as a side, exotic fruits work well here with Aviyal.  This is how they served it in the Yoga Ashram (where the food was excellent).

Foodie Fact

Coconuts are wonderfully healthy, containing high levels of Lauric Acid which is anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-bacteria.  They also have the highest level of electrolytes known to man, making them perfect when exercising or when dehydrated.  In some parts of the world it is even used intravenously for the purpose of re-hydration.  Coconut can boost our metabolism and make our skin shine.

Keralan sunset

A Keralan sunset, Kannur

Categories: Curries, Healthy Eating, Peace and Parsnips, Recipes, Salads, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Honey Corn and Coconut Korma (Dairy-free)

Honey Corn and Coconut Korma (Vegan)

Honey Corn and Coconut Korma (Vegan)

Creamy, rich and super tasty Korma without all that ghee and cream business.

One of Jane’s creations here that will eclipse any former notion you have of what a korma should taste like, in a very good way. The influence for this came from the brilliant ‘Shoshoni Cookbook’ that we are loving at the minute. Our cookbook library has recently been vastly extended, we now own four, this being our favourite at the moment. We have made several Beach House touches to the dish and we are certain that the wonderful folk at the Shoshoni Yoga Retreat will not mind.

Meal time at Shoshoni Yoga Retreat, near Boulder, Colorado, U.S.

Usually, food served in Yoga retreats is rather amazing and very healthy, normally adhereing to the ayurvedic methods of food preparation.  Most food made are what is called sattvic in nature, meaning that they do not stimulate the body or mind and posses only good energy, are clean and pure and enhance the power of the body and mind.  The cooks in Yoga centres and the like have alot of responsibility, normally dealing with many special dietary requirements, this normally makes them very well versed in all things nutrition and always cooking to a tight budget, getting the maximum flavour and texture from the produce available.  I have only had amazing food in yoga retreats, always with the added bonus of it being nourishing to the body and mind.  Jane cooked this dish to recreate that positive atmosphere in the Beach House and it worked a treat.

This is a sweet curry and dairy free to boot, the creaminess associated with a Korma comes from the coconut and the almond milk. We did not have any almonds in the cupboards, but we both thought that adding some almond cream (soaked and blended almonds) would have made the dish even more decadent and rich. It doesn’t need it at all, just something to take it over the edge!

This is an unusual curry and tastes like no other, a great dish for adding a new spectrum of flavours to the table and I imagine would be especially good when eaten with other curries in a feast-style environment. This korma would add an awesome sweet coconut kick to the table.

I ate quite a few sweet curries in India, but they are normally not my favourites, Jane toned the honey side of things down here but you may like it sweeter. Jane has a pronounced sweet tooth and found it sweet enough, so make of that what you will.

Due to having such a corker of a night we forgot to take pictures of the food so these are actually of the leftovers. We ate the dish with roast garlic flatbreads and cumin raita, but here I’ve served the Korma on a bed of spinach, a lot lighter and healthier for a Monday evening bite.

YOU MIGHT LIKE THESE OTHER BEACH HOUSE CURRIES:

Punjabi Rajma Chawal – Red Kidney Bean Curry

Rambo Tomato and Roast Fennel Curry

Rainbow Kale and Tofu Sabzi

Makes a large pan of curry, enough for 6-8 folk:

Honey Corn and Coconut Korma

Honey Corn and Coconut Korma

The Bits

1 onion (cut in large slices), 4 sweet potatos (cut into wedges), 2 potatoes (boiled and cut into chunks), 1 green pepper (cut in half and seeded), 1/2 chopped tomaotes, 2 teas grated ginger, 2 teas ground cumin, 1/2 teas ground cardamom, 2 teas ground coriander, 1 teas turmeric, 1 medium carrot (thinly sliced), 3 cups fresh or frozen sweet corn kernels, 2/3 cup grated coconut (desiccated will do here), 1/2 cup almond milk, 1 tbs honey, 1 1/2 teas sea salt

Do It

Begin to fry off your vegetables, making them nice and sweet.  Start with the sweet potato in a frying pan on medium heat, a little oil, then fry and stir for 3 minutes, then add your onions and peppers.  Use your largest pan, so that the vegetables are not tightly packed in.  Once all have a nice colour and are softened, set aside, should take around 10-15 minutes.

Make your masala, place onions, tomatoes and peppers in a blender with your spices and blitz until smooth.

In a large saucepan, warm your masala for 3 minutes, then add both potatoes, carrot, corn, coconut, almond milk and honey.  Salt to taste and simmer for 20 minutes.   Add more water if needed.

Serve

With your favourite curry condiments, a nice savoury raita would go down a treat here.  We had ours with garlic flat breads (recipe to follow soon hopefully!)

We Love It!

A really surprising dish that is easy to get together and has a delicious, satisfying flavour; all that roasted vegetables and a potent masala makes for flavour fireworks!

Sweetcorn

Foodie Fact

Sweet corn is a gluten free cereal and for its sweetness, relatively low in carbs.  Corn is a great source of dietary fibre, but should be avoided by diabetics as it has a high glycemic index.

Categories: Curries, Dairy/ Lactose Free, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Imam Bayildi – Turkish Stuffed Aubergines (Vegan)

Imam Bayeldi (Turkish Stuffed Subergines)

Imam Bayeldi (Turkish Stuffed Subergines)

Turkish food has always tantalised me, Ive had a few dishes that promised so much, but finding good Turkish restaurants is difficult in the UK and I have resorted to educating and cooking them myself at home.  Isn’t that always the best way anyway!  I much prefer a home cooked meal, prepared with love than something bought.  I am not a good diner out-er, I rarely have a good time and seem perpetually let down by the food.  This maybe due to the fact that I live in the sticks in Wales and in Spain, in the big cities, where cultures merge and intermingle, things are a very different story.

Thing is, I’ve always been more fond of food from further afield that Europe (is Turkey now a part of the ever expanding ‘Europe’, I hope not!?), maybe its the exotic element and imagery of new and distant horizons.  Turkish cuisine has such bold flavours and is normally pretty simple to get together, focusing on super fresh produce and a constant flow of awesome yoghurt!

A wonderful dish this ‘Imam Bayeldi’ of Turkish origin, bursting with flavour and delicious texture.  You’ve probably made something like this in the past, but its nice to get a specific origin to things, I love the heritage and tradition attached to dishes, the stories and legends behind them.

Imam Bayeldi translates as ‘the priest fainted’, according to Armenian legend, a housewife was surprised by a visit from a priest and created this dish especially (whipped it up quickly I’m sure!)  At the first mouthful the priest fainted with delight!

I have been buying a few cheap as chips cook books on-line, I’m shifting slightly away from constant experimentation in the kitchen and looking at what other people are up to.  The books I am buying are mainly retreat style cooking, Ayurveda and Macro-biotic influenced; I have some very cool Zen Buddhist cook books but this recipe (well most of it) came from the awesome ‘Shoshoni Cookbook’, which is a Yoga retreat up in the hills of Colorado.  The food is simple, vibrant and superbly nutritious.  The philosophy of cooking at Shoshoni, be ever present and immersed in your activity, constantly channeling love and good intention into your food and its preparation are essential for me in the whole wonderful food game, enjoyment!  This is food charged with positive energy, cooked from a special place.

I know there are many different ways of preparing this dish, but this is my favourite.  The aubergines are very tender after boiling and the light spices and herbs work very well together.

Aubergines can be grown in Britain, but only in greenhouses.  We are struggling getting good local produce at the moment, so our seasonal fare is sparse.  Fingers crossed this cold weather won’t hold, it’s been gloriously sunny in the days and freezing in the morning and nights.  Not good for our poor plants, but makes for beautiful days walking.

You my live in a lovely part of the world where your veggies are just plain amazing and sweet.  I would omit the honey and even the tomato puree in this case, with great produce, well, it speaks for itself and needs no assistance.

Yemek Keyfini!  Enjoy!

Serves two quite nicely.

The Bits

2 aubergine (whole), 1 onion (diced small), 3 cloves garlic (crushed), 4 tomatoes (diced small), 1 red pepper (diced small), 1/2 teas ground coriander, 1 teas cumin seeds, 1 tbsp tomato puree, 1 teas honey, 3 tbs pine nuts, 1 cup coriander (leaves and stems), 3 tbs olive oil, sea salt and cracked pepper (to taste), parsley and mint (chopped for topping)

P1190828

Aubergines/eggplants ready for the pan

Do It

Place aubergines in a pot of boiling water, press down into the water with a lid and boil for 15 to 20 minutes until tender.  Do not overcook, they have a lovely smooth texture, but the skin is fragile and breaks easily (as I learnt the hard way!)  When cooked, run under cold water to chill quickly.

Split the aubergines down the centre lengthwise and gently score out the pulp and remove without piercing shells.  Good luck here! Keep the skins warm somewhere of your choosing, a warm covered plate works well.

Saute your cumin seeds for two minutes, they will pop a bit, then add onion and cook until translucent, add aubergine and cook for 10 minutes or until tender, add ground coriander, tom puree, pepper, garlic, honey (if needed) and tomatoes and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Add some of your herbs (coriander, parsley or mint or a mix) and pine nuts, season well to taste.

P1190839

Serve

Fill the warm shells with vegetables and sprinkled with some more herbs and a good drizzle of amazing olive oil.  Traditionally served with Mudjedera (recipe to come soon) or cous cous.

We Love It!

A simple, tasty dish that didn’t make us faint this time, but we’ll work on it!

Foodie Fact 

Aubergines have very few calories but plenty of fibre, it contains loads of the vitamin B’s and some vitamin C.  It also has good levels of manganese which acts as an anti-oxidant around the body and plenty of potassium which is good for many of your parts! (nerves and heart especially).

Categories: Dinner, Recipes, Vegan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

“I beat cancer with a raw diet and holistic lifestyle”

My family has been affected by cancer, as have most.  Jane and my Mum recently ran the ‘Race for life’ in Caernarfon (a 3 mile run for women to raise money for cancer research), I went along as the official photographer.  I was really touched by the amount of people there, all wearing bibs with messages to loved ones lost to the disease.   

This is an inspirational article that highlights the benefits taking a more holistic, diet based approach to beating the big ‘C’ and any other disease for that matter.  Thanks to Janette for the wonderful tale of hope and to freshnetwork the great site where I read this article. 

When fruit and vegetables are eaten raw, they are only of benefit to the body. Each containing a whole host of nutrients and good things that will help to make you shine!

“I beat cancer with a raw diet and holistic lifestyle”

Janette Murray-Wakelin beat cancer through a raw food diet and has enjoyed better health than ever since going raw. She tells Sarah Best the story of her journey to optimum health.

When Janette Murray-Wakelin was diagnosed with highly aggressive carcinoma breast cancer over six years ago, she was given six months to live. The tumour was three centimetres and the cancer had spread into the chest wall and the lymph nodes. It was recommended that she undergo conventional chemotherapy and radiation treatment, which she was told may possibly extend her life a further six months.

At 52 years, a mother of two and grandmother of one, she was not willing to accept this prognosis. “I had lived a very healthy lifestyle, being vegetarian for 25 years and vegan for the previous 15 years,” Janette explains. “I have also been extremely physically active all my life, so I was quite shocked with the diagnosis. However, the power of intention is far greater than that of fear, and I had every intention of staying around for a very long time!”

Janette was alerted to the possibility of cancer being present when her little grandson Kieran inadvertently found the tumour. “I had been carrying him all day as we walked around a local festival and he had fallen asleep in my arms,” she remembers. “When we finally got home and I put him down, I noticed some pain in the breast area where he had been holding on to me. It was then that I discovered the lump. I was not overly perturbed; I had always done regular self breast examinations and had never had any sign of a problem. In fact, apart from a bout of scarlet fever and measles as a tiny child, I had never been sick in my life. I have never had so much as a cold and I’ve never taken any drugs, not even an aspirin! I thought it was just bruising to the tissue from being held onto for hours by my grandson.”

It was Janette’s daughter who suggested she should have it looked at and the following day she had an ultrasound and biopsy, which led to the diagnosis. “My intuitive response to the recommended treatment was that it did not make sense to compromise the body’s system further,” Janette explains. “It seemed obvious to me that I should be helping the body to rejuvenate and rebuild, thereby reversing the problem. My instinct told me that treating the symptoms would not address the cause. I was also convinced that I was not meant to die of cancer, so I treated the diagnosis as a challenge. It seemed to me that this was just a message from my body that there was a problem I needed to deal with.”

A year earlier, Janette had been present at her grandson’s birth and had held his little hand for his first 24 hours of life. “I promised him that we would have many wonderful times together over the years and that I would always be there for him,” she recalls. “Now he had brought this to my attention so that I could take care of the problem and be able to keep my promise!”

Janette and her husband Alan have spent most of their lives travelling together worldwide. They married and their two children were born while they were still in their early twenties. In search of a healthy lifestyle for their little family, this adventurous couple sailed from their home country of New Zealand when their children were very small. Their sailing boat was completely self-sufficient, relying on the four winds to take them throughout the South Pacific; visiting, living and working in places like the Tongan Islands, Micronesia and Papua New Guinea.

“Our time on the ocean was incredible,” Janette recalls. “We learned a lot about ourselves from living on the sea. Most of the time it was so serene, but there were moments of awe when the storms raged around us! It was fun home-schooling our children and as a family, we grew very close,” she mused. “It was a carefree life with very little stress, our food was mostly fresh fruit and vegetables and our environment was pretty clean and green.”

It was hard for Janette to think of what the cause of her illness may have been given the healthy lifestyle she had been living. However, during a maintenance refit for the sailboat, she did suffer an accident, which exposed her to a high dose of toxins. “I was painting the boat when the scaffolding collapsed under me,” she recalls. “It happened so fast that I was still holding the can of paint when I hit the ground! I was completely covered in marine paint that has toxic ‘antifouling’ properties. It was in my hair, my eyes, nose, ears and mouth. I ingested quite a bit and my skin was covered in paint. It took three months before my normal skin colour came back and since the skin is the largest organ of the body, over-exposure for me was inevitable!”

After four years sailing in the South Pacific, the family embarked on a new adventure for a further four years; living and working on a cargo ship on the inland waterways throughout Europe. “This adventure is another story in itself,” Janette says, “but during that time I was also exposed to toxic fall-out from the Chernobyl disaster. Looking back over my life and remembering those two times when I was over-exposed to toxins, I realized that my body must have been highly compromised.”

Whether it was one incident or the other, or perhaps the combination of both, Janette was sure that the toxic load in her body predisposed her to the onset of cancer. “I could think of no other explanation, but once I had established the likely cause, I felt more empowered to do something about it,” she says. “I was no longer guessing, taking a gamble on treatment, nor in fear of the outcome. I knew that I could take control of the situation myself, doing 100% the best I could for my body.”

The family’s initial reaction to the diagnosis was to research all they could about breast cancer and the possible causes and the treatments that were recommended, as well as looking into natural holistic therapies and making lifestyle changes that would be most likely to result in a positive outcome.

“We needed to know all the possibilities so that I could make an informed choice as to the best course of action to take,” she says. “I knew that it made sense to do everything I could to give the body the tools it needed to take me on my journey to optimum health. Our extensive research not only gave us the knowledge to do just that, but also the confidence to know that I had made the right choice.”

With the help of a naturopathic physician, Janette established a regime that would support mind, body and spirit. This intensive regime included intravenous immune therapy; infrared detoxification therapy; increasing the amount of oxygen to the body through ozone treatment; conscious breathing; aerobic exercise; visualization; meditation; positive thinking and spiritual awareness; and optimal nutrition through juicing, wheatgrass and living food nutrition.

For the following six months after receiving the diagnosis, Janette spent three hours a day, five days a week at the naturopathic clinic having therapy to help boost the immune system. “I used the time sitting hooked up to the intravenous drip to relax. It also gave me time to do more research,” she said.

She increased the amount of exercise that she was already doing on a daily basis, incorporating yoga and long distance running. “With yoga I was able to reunite with myself. I came to know my inner self and to love myself unconditionally. My running became more meditative. I chose to run on trails in the mountains or barefoot in the sand along the beach. I could feel again the sense of freedom that I remembered when I ran as a child.” She adds: “I visualized achieving personal goals that I had long since put aside – perhaps I would write, perhaps I would paint. I visualized myself proudly looking on at my grandson’s wedding then going full circle and being present at his child’s birth.”

Daily sessions in the infrared sauna maximized the detoxification process. “I could feel my body ridding itself of toxins while enjoying the feeling of complete relaxation during the sessions,” she remembers. “At the same time, my nutritional intake took a huge leap. I started juicing in earnest. It made sense that I could consume more nutrients by juicing because I just wouldn’t be able to eat that amount of food. If it takes 4 cups of carrots to produce 1 cup of juice, and I could drink 4 cups of juice per day, I knew I was way ahead of the game,” she said. “I think I was close to consuming a truckload of carrots every week during those six months! My hands turned carrot-coloured, but I didn’t care! I was alive and running!”

She also started taking wheatgrass: “When I learned that one ounce of wheatgrass juice has the equivalent nutritional value of 2lbs of green leafy vegetables – more than most people eat in a week – I never hesitated.” Apart from having all the vitamins and most of the minerals the body needs to be healthy, wheatgrass juice also has all the amino acids making it a complete protein. Like all greens, wheatgrass is also very high in chlorophyll, which is like giving an oxygen infusion to the body. When taken, the juice goes directly to the bloodstream, oxygenating the blood and the whole body.

“I knew from the research that we had done that this was a crucial factor in stopping the mutation of cancer cells,” Janette explains. “Cancer cannot survive in an oxygenated environment, therefore the more oxygen I could pump into my body through exercise, conscious breathing and drinking wheatgrass, the better!”

Although Janette had been vegetarian and vegan for most of her life, she decided that if she was going to “give it 100%”, she would also eliminate all cooked food, thereby getting the maximum amount of nutrients from all foods she consumed. “I couldn’t believe the difference in the way I felt within only one week of changing to 100% raw food,” she remembers. “The first thing I noticed was that my clarity of mind was intensely heightened. I no longer had to think about decision making. Everything became very clear; there was no hesitation. I lost 15lb within the first month of eating 100% raw food, which took me just below my recommended weight. The following month my weight came back up a few pounds and has not changed since,” she says.

During the first six months, Janette’s body revisited old injuries that had obviously not completely healed. For example, during her accident with the paint, she sustained an injury to her elbow that had left her unable to straighten her arm. She experienced ten days of pain in the elbow, similar to that which she had endured at the time of the accident, but when the pain stopped she could straighten her arm again! “I also found I had much more energy than before and that it lasted longer. It was especially evident during my long training runs and my physical performance level increased,” she says. “There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that consuming 100% raw food made a huge difference to my recovery time and to my overall healing.”

It is interesting that although the lifestyle changes Janette made were minimal – as her diet and lifestyle were already very healthy – the positive results were profound. “I really only had to stop eating the odd muffin, a sandwich now and then, eliminate the pasta and stop wokking my vegetables!” she laughs. “I had already eliminated meat and dairy and I had never eaten processed or junk food, so the change to 100% raw food for me was not that big, but the change to my overall health was huge. Not only did I immediately experience clarity of mind, increased energy, specific injury healing and a feeling of well-being, but I actually cured myself of cancer!”

Within the six months Janette had been told by doctors was her maximum expected lifespan, she received a clean bill of health. There was no longer any sign of cancer cells in her body. At that point, she came off the immune therapy regime, but has continued with all other aspects of her raw lifestyle. Janette is quick to mention that those crucial six months were also filled with love, laughter and lots of support from her family and friends. “I am blessed with a loving family who rallied around me and helped with the research, with physical and mental support, and most of all,” she emphasizes, “with their unwavering conviction that the path I had chosen was mine to choose. I believe having unconditional support is also paramount in healing the body.”

She adds: “I now have two more grandchildren whom I believe I would never have known had I not made these informed choices to follow a raw diet and lifestyle. My diagnosis of cancer and resulting journey to optimum health has been an experience I am truly grateful for. I know for certain that I will continue on the raw path, as I continue to experience more health benefits and an ever-increasing enlightened consciousness. Every day is exciting when you are raw!”

As a result of this life changing experience, Janette and Alan established the ZenZero Centre for Optimum Health in Courtenay on Vancouver Island in Canada, where they offer ‘raw lifestyle programmes’ based on a holistic approach incorporating mind, body and spirit. On a weekly basis, health presentations, seminars and workshops are offered by over 40 holistic practitioners affiliated with the centre, and international health educators speak monthly. ZenZero also sponsors weekly and monthly raw food potlucks and has a raw lifestyle store, a raw juice fountain, and The Raw Food Oasis vegan restaurant. Both Janette and Alan are 100% raw and their staff of 20 also follow the raw lifestyle.

This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Get Fresh! magazine.

Categories: Healing foods, Healthy Eating, Raw Food, Superfoods | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Yoga and Obesity

A worrying story of growing obesity in the U.K. and how yoga can help.  I think it is a great idea getting kids into yoga at school, good for exercise and relaxation.  They also love it, doing poses like monkeys and tigers.  Thanks to Yoga Wellbeing for this article and promoting yoga in British schools (www.yogawellbeing.co.uk)     

Yoga for Obesity

As per one report nearly 14 percent of British youngsters are clinically obese. The cost of Obesity to the NHS is about £1 billion a year. By 2010 the number of overweight and obese youngsters in the European Union nations is expected to hit 26 million. An estimated 20,000 obese youngsters will have type 2 diabetes as per another report.

Obesity put strain on heart, respiratory and eliminatory system. It also increases the chances of diabetes, hypertension and heart diseases. In stressful people who eat very fast and in excess and secondly in household person who eat from boredom. As the people put on weight they tend to become less happy because of their appearance and become more frustrated. Some people think by taking insufficient food can help in reducing weight. But when they start dieting, body starts to slow down in order to conserve energy and boost its chances of survival. This is why weight loss tends to slow down as we continue to diet. So in a way dieting is not the good method for reducing weight.

Some of the schools in the UK are planning to introduce yoga for thousands of young students. This is an excellent step in the direction of fighting the obesity problem of UK. Yoga practice provides an excellent means for maintaining balanced weight and overcoming obesity problem, provided a daily yoga program is followed with regular routine.

Along with Yoga, healthy diet at proper time and practice of relaxation technique is very helpful for overcoming obesity and maintaining balanced weight. Click here if you would like to know more about our one to one sessions or kids classes.

http://www.yogawellbeing.co.uk

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