Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

Harira on the hob

Harira on the hob

We regularly have an identity crisis with dishes, turning traditional fare on its head, ‘Beach House-ing’ things you could say.  We don’t mean it, no offence to the original recipes and food heritage in question, its just we like to play in the kitchen.  Here’s another traditional recipe we have messed about with, thankfully the results were rather delicious.

The best Harira I have ever had was for breakfast (regularly) in the village of Chefchaeoun, known to many a traveller for its exceptional soup, jalaba (hooded cloak garment worn by most Moroccans) production and wonderful mountain location.  Its small winding streets hide many a wonderful eating experience, rows of blue houses (yes blue!) make this one of the most distinctive and stunning villages in that vast old place.

I moved there for a while, took up residence in a room situated on the walls of the Hamam (the communal bath), the warmest room in town.  You see its high up there (in more ways than one!) and you wake chilled to the bone and needing a serious bowl of sustenance.  Abdullah provided.

He was a wonderful cook, in nothing more than a space between two buildings, a few squat tables and two gas burners with huge steel pots, Abdullah created the authentic Moroccan dining experience for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  It was like a French Bistro without the pretense and price tag.  My kind of joint for sure.

For a few pennies, Abdullah would dip his oversized laddle into a pot of bubbling Harira and dish you up an epic bowl of full-on morning ammunition, sometimes with a tooth-less smile that shifted the early morning fug.  This hearty soup fuelled me on many a hike around the Rif Mountains and also on days spent lounging around playing card games with other punks holed up there. It came with a wedge of steaming flat bread, olive oil and a bowl of spices to use liberally.  I sat wearing my Jalaba (ever the over bearing tourist that I am) eating with the local men in silence, canteen style.  This kind of experience is what gets my food based juices really flowing.

Chefchaouen

I like cooking soups, its a soulful pursuit.  You don’t have to be to precious, there are rules, but not many, a little like Morocco itself.  This is the situation where I revel.  Add less water here for a nice stew.

Here’s to you Abdullah.  Peace be with you.  Hamdullah!

Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

Makes one small pan full (enough for 3-4 bowls)

The Bits

1 1/2 cup dried chickpeas (cooked), 3/4 litre fresh water (or chickpea cookign juices, even better), 1 tbs vegetable oil, 1 inch fresh ginger (finely diced), 2 cloves garlic (minced), 2 onions (finely diced), 1 yellow pepper (diced), 3 ripe tomatoes (with flavour), 3 cups chopped rainbow chard (stems separated from the leaves), 1 teas ground turmeric, 1 teas smoked paprika, large pinch finely ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds, 1/2 teas cumin seeds, 2tbs tomato paste
1 lemon, 1 tbs flour (of your choice), 1/4 cup fresh coriander leaves (leaves picked, stems chopped), 1 cup red lentils, 3 dates (finely chopped), 1 teas fresh ground pepper, 2 – 3 teas sea salt

Add just  2 cups of water to make this a hearty stew.

As with all soups/ stews, depending on the quality of your veggies, you many need to add some vegetable stock to the final soup if the flavour thin on the ground.

Harira bubblin' away

Harira bubblin’ away

Do It

Soak your chickpeas overnight in a saucepan.  Drain and refresh with new water, well covered.  Add 1/4 teas bicarb of soda (this makes them soft and cook quicker), bring to a boil and lower heat.  Vigorously simmer for 20 minutes or until chickpeas are just tender.  Remember they will be cooked more in the soup. Keep the cooking liquor for use in the soup, it has a wonderfully full flavour.

Warm the oil in a thick bottomed sauce pan, add your onions, cumin seeds and caraway seeds and saute the onions for a few minutes until glassy, add garlic, pepper and ginger, stir for a couple of minutes and then add all chard stems (add earlier if they are a little tough) and spices, warm through for a minute and now add your tomatoes, dates, lentils, tomato paste, warm through for a minute then add your water/ chickpea juice. Bring to a rolling boil and turn down heat to the lowest setting, add your chickpeas and leave to simmer for 20 minutes.

When ready to serve, bring back to just about boiling, add your chard leaves and coriander stems.  Re-cover and allow to cook for a few minutes.

Serve

A lemon wedge, a good glug of good olive oil with green olives and brown rice, if you’d like to make this dinner.

For a special touch, we have it sprinkled with roasted and chopped almonds.

Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

We Love It!

With winter lurking up the hill, we are getting back to our hearty soups.  Harira is definately one of our fav’s and it is very cool when you have pleasant memories attached to a dish.  Food has amazing transporting properties, the sights and tastes so evocative and alive in memories.

Foodie Fact

Spices are much more than just incredible tasting, the vast majority boast some quite brilliant health properties (as long as we don’t burn them in the pan).

Turmeric is a root similar to ginger and in its raw state has very potent flavour, its wonderful stuff.  Dried is the best we can normally do on this island.  It is peppery and sweet, warm and bitter and has even been likened to orange peel (if very fresh indeed).

Now the nitty gritty and real magic.  Turmeric is anti-microbial, anti-flatulent and strongly anti-bacterial.

Heavy plate version with rice, olives, fresh coriander and lashings of olive oil

Heavy plate version with rice, olives, fresh coriander and lashings of olive oil

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Categories: Autumn, Recipes, Soups, Vegan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

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12 thoughts on “Rainbow Chard and Red Lentil Harira

  1. Yum! Especially as the weather turns colder. Leaving for India soon, so will have to find a substitute for the chard, probably some kind of spinach leaves will have to do. Thanks for the recipe!

    • India! We are heading over in January for a while. How exciting. There are loads of soups like this over there. Happy daal days! Namaste and Happiness, lee and janex

  2. As am sitting wrapped in my comfort blanket I can simply see myself eating this. I simply love it. Great touch with the almonds. Thank you so much Lee, you know how to bring those flavors to life.Never worry about identity crisis-celebrate variety! Thank you as always. :-)

    • Stay cosy Ivelina, its a glorious day today on our side of the pond. The sun is shining and we’ve been apple picking! Peace and Light, lee and janex

  3. The Veggie Green

    Sooo delicious looking, love this sort of warm filling food… Didn’t know about the second property of turmeric?? I love the taste of it :)

  4. I love comforting soul food like this. Poured over a simple bowl of brown rice this kind of meal makes you feel one with the world :). Cheers guys and notice how nice and patiently I am waiting for the cake recipes? No being pushy at ALL! ;)

    • On there way! We are digging through Gran’s old recipes as we speak! Peace and Light Dear Tazzers!x

      • I am about to speak about myself in the third person, please forgive me (I am so excited!) “Fran is most appreciative and will SQUEE with joy when holding precious familial cake recipes in her hot little hands”. I love other peoples culinary history. I love sharing the cooking love and cheers to the MAX Jane, you are amazing for sharing :)

      • Gertude’s Chocy Delight is on the way, Jane is away on Anglesey island, but it will be hover over to Taz very soon. Humble apologise and light from the green hills of here, leex (keep the faith!!!!!!!!X)

      • Learning to wait is a very good lesson and the reward (Gertrude’s Chocy Delight) is a good one indeed :)

  5. My taste-buds are already eating this wonderful dish…. Thank you Lee for this :-)

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